What about knots and sap -wood?

This grade looks natural yet consistent, with few knots. Up to 10% sap-wood can be found in wood boards, along with considerable grain and colour variation, but only small knots. Big part of the wood’s character is showing through large knots, dark streaks, filled knots and colour variation.  Large knots, splits, cracks and any amount of sap- wood make hardwood a fun choice, and mean that your floor will be all that more distinctive. Knots occur naturally in wood where a branch grows out of the main trunk. They can go deep into the timber’s core. In terms of flooring, there are two types of knot. A dead knot is where the core of the knot has fallen out or been removed, and then filled. With a live knot, the core remains in the board.

The rustic and extra rustic grades contain both types of knots.shutterstock_135005594

Solid and Engineered Wood Flooring

Solid and Engineered Wood Flooring
Solid wood flooring is a solid piece of wood from the top to the bottom. The thickness varies from ¾” to 5/16”. Those wood floors can be installed both above and on grade, and they can be sanded and refinished during its service life.
Engineered wood floors from other side are also real wood floors made by using multiple wood or wood composite veneers. The veneers can be from the same or from different wood species. It have a great stability because the grain of each veneer runs in different direction. This mean that the wood will resist expanding and contracting during fluctuations in humidity and temperature which is really making it wide usable. This type of flooring can also be sanded and refinished and it can be installed above, on or below grade.

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TOP 10 HARDEST WOODS

TOP 10 HARDEST WOODS:

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1. Quebracho – From the Spanish “quebrar hacha,” which literally means
“axe breaker.” Aptly named, wood in the Schinopsis genus is among the
heaviest and hardest in the world.
2. Lignum Vitae -Widely accepted as the hardest wood in the world–this
wood has been listed as an endangered species and is listed in CITES.
Consider Verawood as a very close substitute.
3. Gidgee – This Australian endemic is both very heavy and very strong.
Some pieces are dark enough to be used as an ebony substitute: one that’s
even harder than the original article.
4. Snakewood – It’s easy to see what makes Snakewood so unique–its patterns
and markings resemble the skin of a snake. Limited supply and high demand
make this one of the most expensive woods on eart.
5. Verawood – Sometimes called Argentine Lignum Vitae, this wood is a gem:
inexpensive, great olive-green color, beautiful feathery grain pattern, and
it takes a great natural polish on the lathe.
6. Camelthorn – Formerly classified as a member of the Acacia genus, this
south African hardwood is a tough customer. The wood is stubbornly hard,
and the tree is protected by giant sharp thorns.
7. African Blackwood – In some parts of the world, this wood has achieved
an almost legendary status. Historical evidence points to this wood
(rather than Diospyros spp.) being the original “ebony.”
8. Black Ironwood – Pieces are very seldom seen for sale, as this tree is
too small to produce commercially viable lumber. Like the unrelated
Desert Ironwood, Black Ironwood is an excellent choice for small
turning projects.
9. Katalox / Wamara – Some pieces can be just about a dark as true ebony,
while others are a more reddish brown with black streaks. So much depth
in the Swartzia genus, there’s something for everyone!
10. Cebil- Also known as Curupay or by the exaggerated name Patagonian
Rosewood, Cebil is not a true rosewood. It has a highly variable streaked
appearance not too unlike Goncalo Alves.

Maple wood – hard and resistant

MAPLE: There are 115 species of maple. Only 5 commercially important species grow in the U.S. Two of the five are hard rock maple and sugar maple.

Properties: Maple is so hard and resistant to shocks that it is often used for bowling alley floors. Its diffuse evenly sized pores give the wood a fine texture and even grain. Maple that has a curly grain is often used for violin backs (the pattern formed is known as fiddleback figure). Burls, leaf figure, and birds-eye figures found in maple are used extensively for veneers. The Birds eye figure in maple is said to be the result of stunted
growth and is quite rare.

Uses: Maple is used extensively for American colonial furniture, especially in medium and lower priced categories.It can also be stained to simulate cherry wood, which it resembles.

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SOFTWOODS top 3 :

SOFTWOODS top 3 :

PINE: Pine is a softwood which grows in most areas of the Northern Hemisphere. There are more than 100 species worldwide.

Properties: Pine is a soft, white or pale yellow wood which is light weight, straight grained and lacks figure.It resists shrinking and swelling. Knotty pine is often used for decorative effect.
Uses: Pine is often used for country or provincial furniture. Pickled, whitened, painted and oil finishes are often used on this wood.

ASH: There are 16 species of ash which grow in the eastern United States. Of these, the white ash is the largest and most commercially important.

Properties: Ash is a hard, heavy, ring porous hardwood. It has a prominent grain that resembles oak, and a white to light brown colour. Ash can be differentiated from hickory (pecan) which it also resembles, by white dots in the darker summer wood which can be seen with the naked eye. Ash burls have a twisted, interwoven figure.
Uses: Ash is widely used for structural frames and steam bent furniture pieces. It is often less expensive than comparable hardwoods.

HICKORY: There are 15 species of hickory in the eastern United States, eight of which are commercially important.

Properties: Hickory is one of the heaviest and hardest woods available. Pecan is a species of hickory sometimes used in furniture. It has a close grain without much figure.
Uses: Wood from the hickory is used for structural parts, especially where strength and thinness are required. Decorative hickory veneers are also commonly used.

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Never Do To A Wood Floor

10 Things To Never Do To A Wood Floor
1.Do not use abrasives or harsh chemicals to clean your floor
2.Do not use hard casters on any furniture directly on your hardwood floor
3.Do not use steam mops on your hardwood floor
4.Do not pour cleaning product directly on floor
5.Do not wait too long between refinish projects
6.Do not wear high heel shoes on wood floors
7.Do not leave the legs of your furniture unprotected
8.Do not drag furniture or heavy appliances over your hardwood floors
9.Do not let your dog’s nails remain untrimmed
10.Do not allow any stains remain untreated !1781014_1419768084933353_134358593_o.jpg